It does seem that whenever a story about some faraway homeowners association finds its way into town newspapers, nearly always it’s because something has gone awry. Either there’s an ongoing dispute about a flag display (“Indiana Couple Violate Rules for Flying U.S. Flag”), a fencing disagreement (“Border Feud is Childish and Dangerous”), or something else to catch readers’ eyes. The pettier, the better (“North Carolina Man in Dispute over Pansies Planted in Common Area”). Why does this hit the local news? Let’s face it: it is sort of fun to read about!property management houston, Houston Homeowners Association Property Management Houston has a bit more information regarding Houston Homeowners Association’s that everyone should know.

The downside is that when those instances are all we hear about, it can lead area buyers to believe they should stay away properties with HOAs when they are buying a home. But the fact is, town homeowners associations exist to protect the common interests of Houston homeowners and Houston residents. Houston Homeowners associations can and do offer many benefits. The key is understanding what they are, what the costs are—then choosing the right association.

Know the Rules

The first step in evaluating any Houston homeowner’s association is to thoroughly examine a current copy of its rules. When you realize that it’s natural to focus on the individual property instead of the community, it’s more understandable why many prospective buyers pay too little attention to this step. Later, they may find themselves in violation of rules they should have noted before. Those stories about flags are typical: usually the problem was not with the flag, but with rules about flagpoles. Small details can become big problems when the homeowners association ‘covenants, conditions and restrictions’ remain unread in a kitchen drawer.

Comparing Costs and Amenities

In addition to the rules of a contending town homeowners association, there is the matter of its fee structure. Older homeowners associations are often (not always) less expensive than newer HOAs. Yet price is not the whole picture. Especially when evaluating two or more associations, it’s time to sharpen a pencil and compare what the fees cover. One association may include lawn maintenance, while another leaves that as your responsibility…and there may be value for the community (and your property’s resale value) in guaranteeing proper maintenance by everyone. One HOA may have a pool, tennis courts and other amenities, while another may only offer a community room. Newer town homeowner associations are tending to offer more features, but not always.

 

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